BIO and USPTO Trace the Journey of Biotech Inventions

BIO will be co-hosting an event with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the issuance of U.S.patent 4,259,444 to Ananda Chakrabarty following the Supreme Court case, Diamond v. Chakrabarty, which held that Chakrabarty’s bioengineered bacterium was eligible for patenting.  The event will be held during the BIO International Convention on the morning of Thursday, June 30, at the Walter E.Washington Convention Center inWashington, D.C. 

See the BIOtech NOW article for more details.

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USPTO Requesting Comments on Humanitarian Technologies

In case you missed it, on September 20 the United States Patent Office issued a request for comments on incentivizing humanitarian technologies and licensing through the intellectual property system.

 The USPTO is trying to incentivize humanitarian technologies by creating a “fast-track ex parte reexamination voucher pilot program.”  The program will give priority to humanitarian technology patents shortening the review process to six months.  The USPTO also hopes the program will reduce costs for humanitarian technology patents.

 The proposed legal standard the PTO will use to define “humanitarian use” and “humanitarian research” are as follows;

 “‘‘Humanitarian use’’ would comprise four principles: subject matter, effectiveness, availability, and access. In general terms, subject matter evaluates whether the patented technology addresses a recognized humanitarian problem. Effectiveness judges whether the technology can be used or is being used to address that issue. Availability determines whether the technology is available to an affected impoverished population. Access evaluates whether the applicant has made significant efforts to increase access to the technology among such populations.”

 “‘‘Humanitarian research’’ would comprise two principles: significance and access. Significance requires that the patented technology make a significant contribution to research on a problem that predominantly affects an impoverished population, such as the tropical diseases identified by the FDA in its priority review voucher scheme. Access determines that the patented technology was made available to researchers on generous terms. “

 The PTO asks comments to focus on the twelve questions found in the Request for Comment.    

 To make a comment to the USPTO on this issue send an email to HumanitarianProgram@uspto.gov