BIO’s Intellectual Property Counsels Committee Seattle Meeting Topics

Join us for BIO’s Intellectual Property Counsels Committee Meeting in Seattle April 13-15.  You can find the session topics below.

Whose Rights Are They, Anyway? Implications from and a Discussion on Stanford v. Roche

The pending Supreme Court review of Stanford v. Roche has brought out multiple perspectives on the disposition of ownership rights in federally funded inventions under Bayh-Dole. This session will explore the different interpretations of the Act’s provisions, and their practical implications for small business grantees or biotech companies who wish to collaborate with federal grantees.

A Landmark Case: The Aftermath of Myriad

This session will provide an update on the status of the case and the arguments that have been made by the various amicus groups, with particular emphasis on the US Government’s brief. We will also explore the impact of “gene patents” on up-and-coming technologies, especially whole genome/whole exome testing.

The Business Case for International Humanitarian Approaches to IP Management and Collaborations

Guest Speaker:

Erik Iverson, Associate General Counsel, Global Health, Gates Foundation

 

Best Practices in Research Collaborations: Joint Inventorship Pitfalls and Ethical Issues in Joint Representation

Don Ware of Foley Hoag will lead a discussion of pitfalls that may arise from prosecuting joint inventions conceived in the course of research collaborations among multiple institutions, including companies, universities and hospitals. Irene Pleasure, Associate General Counsel and Director of Patent Law at Genentech, will provide the in-house perspective on managing patent issues in research collaborations. David Hricik, Professor of Law at Mercer University School of Law and co-author of the treatises Patent Ethics – Prosecution (2009) and Patent Ethics – Litigation (2010), will address the professional responsibilities of patent attorneys involved in the prosecution of jointly-owned patent applications.

How to Stay in the Frying Pan and Out of the Fire: Hot Topics in Ethics for In-House IP Attorneys

Professor David Hricik and Barbara Fiacco of Foley Hoag will present on developments in ethics law for in-house IP counsel, including law firm conflict issues, how to protect the attorney-client privilege, ethical dilemmas created by 21st century social media, in-house counsel ethical pitfalls, and recent developments in IP malpractice law. The game-show format of this panel will be thought-provoking and fun, and will encourage audience participation. CLE Ethics credit is being requested.

Learn How to Navigate IP Landscape in Emerging Markets

BIO members have indicated a strong desire to hear about challenges and key developments in emerging markets such as Korea, China, Brazil and India. Specific challenges, lay of the land, how to negotiate better in these markets.

Double Patenting

This panel will include new developments on the Boehringer Ingelheim Federal Circuit Case, collaboration of multiple parties/how to avoid double patenting rejections and possible coverage of the Sun v. Lilly case.

The Next Chapter: Biosimilars Beyond the Health Care Reform Act

Will Policy Issues Slow the Pace of Implementation? Will the FDA Look to Europe for Guidance on Antibody Biosimilars? Emerging Markets, Emerging Strategies? The panel will cover recent developments in biosimilar, including policy issues based on move to repeal healthcare reform, the recent FDA public hearing on biosimilars, further debate on the meaning of exclusivity, the necessity of clinical trials, the possibility of interchangeability, and developments in Europe with respect to antibody biosimilars.

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BIO Comments to USTR on 2011 Special 301 Review

BIO Comments to USTR on 2011 Special 301 Review (February 15, 2011)

In comments to the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), BIO stresses the critical importance of protecting intellectual property abroad and made recommendations about which countries to include on the Priority Watch and Watch List, which to elevate as a Priority Foreigh Country, and which countries to monitor.

Read the Comments (link to http://bio.org/pdfs/BIO_2011_Special_301_Submission.pdf)

Read the Press Release (link to http://bio.org/news/pressreleases/newsitem.asp?id=2011_0221_01)

Brazilian Attorney General of the Union restricts ANVISA’s role in pharmaceutical patent review

We are receiving reports from Brazil that the Brazilian Attorney General of the Union (AGU) has adopted a position restricting the role of the National Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (ANVISA) in the patenting process for pharmaceutical products and processes. 

Due to a lack of clarity in the Industrial Property Law, ANVISA has used its prior consent role to reject patent applications on the basis of novelty and inventiveness which is officially the role of the Brazilian Patent Office (BPTO).  However, the AGU has made it clear that ANVISA’s sole responsibility is to proceed with the analysis of the sanitary risks of the patented drug to health.  Any other analysis would entail an invasion of the BPTO’s competence. 

The AGU’s opinion cannot be appealed and ANVISA must comply with its terms.

The law firm Di Blasi, Parente, Vaz E Dias & Associados alerted us to the change.  Here is a press release and opinion in Portuguese from the AGU’s Office.