“Importance of new companies for drug discovery: origins of a decade of new drugs.” the Kneller Study

The Kneller study released in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery Journal (November 2010) included interesting data about the involvment of the biotechnology industry in the development of new drugs.  Kneller reviewed 252 FDA approved drugs from 1998-2007  and analyzed the country where the drug was made/discovered and whether the drug was discovered by a university, biotech, or pharma company.  Kneller then sorted the 252 drugs by novelty, priority review vs. standard review (unmet need) and by peak sales. 

Here are the Highlights:

-47% of the 252 FDA approved drugs came from the U.S. 

-Of the 252 drugs discovered worldwide, the U.S. biotechnology industry (including university discovered drugs transferred to biotech companies) created 64.7 new “whole drug equivalents” or 26% of all drugs approved by the FDA. 

-The U.S. biotechnology industry (including university discovered drugs transferred to biotech companies) accounted for  55% of the approved new drugs discovered in the U.S.

-The U.S.  biotechnology industry (including university discovered drugs transferred to biotech companies) created 44.4 novel drugs (accounting for 72% of the total new biotech drugs) and 17 follow-on drugs.

-While most of the biotech drugs approved by the FDA were categorized as “biologics” (64%), 68% of all biotech drugs in the study were “scientifically novel” with 65% receiving “priority” drug status (addressed an unmet need).

To read the full article the link is here.  You will need a subscription to the journal to read the full article.

Advertisements

One Response

  1. […] Link: “Importance of new companies for drug discovery: origins of a … […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: